The Value Of Commissioning A Photographer

The Value Of Commissioning A Photographer

There are roughly 7.5 billion people in the world and about 5 billion of them have a mobile phone. Roughly 4 billion people 80% of phones have a built-in camera. Estimates state that 14 trillion photos are taken annually (14,600,000,000,000) but why do some photographs really make an impression on us?

There are many distinguishing factors that make photographs stand out from those you see or take every day, but despite the marketing of phone and camera manufacture’s, a good camera does not make a good photographer, or produce a good image.

Whether you are a professional or amateur photographer, good photography equipment is costly. As a professional photographer, cameras and lenses are just the basics, there is also lighting equipment, tripods, backdrops, computer software, website costs and most importantly Public Liability Insurance and all of these costs require an income.

Professional photographers continually attend workshops and classes to master their abilities and learn new techniques and these have a cost and are often not cheap to attend and require dedicated time to attend.

Let’s return to that question “have you ever wondered why some photographs really make an impression on us”?

Personally, I think it relates to a combination these key factors

Experience

Skill

Knowledge

Lens choice

Lighting

Image editing

When you commission a photographer, you are investing in the value of these factors which all play a part in producing images that have an impression on the viewer.

We all have different tastes, but in summary photography is like wine, some excellent, some good and some not so good. There is an abundance of cheap wine that can be purchased, but do you value it for its quality or price? By commissioning a photographer, you are more likely to receive either excellent or good photographs, you are investing in them as photographers to create images that have value.

Sadly, there are some people who will screen grab photographers work, or complain about the price of an image and overlook the time involved in the process of creating the photograph. The cost of doing business as a photographer is like any other business, they need to generate a profit to survive, so if you value the images you see, show some appreciation for their time, effort and skill and invest in their work.

Lighting The Way Barnsley Photographic Society

Lighting The Way Barnsley Photographic Society

LIGHTING THE WAY

“Lighting the Way” is different in its approach, with the aim being by learning through reflection, rather than just hands on. The workshop provides the audience with an opportunity to see different types of images where flash has been used and to learn the techniques of how to use and modify flash to create their own light and not just on a subject.

K2Photographic will provide access to all of the portable lighting on the day, including the modifiers, together with different triggers for Sony, Canon, Nikon, Fuji, Panasonic, Olympus, & Pentax cameras.

 

Lighting The Way An Overview:

LIGHTING

  • Strobes: Speedlights, Flash
  • Creating your own light with flash (why & how)

 

CONTROL

  • Types of light modifiers
  • Flags, Silks, Scrims
  • Negative fill

 

LAYERING LIGHT

  • Main or Key light, Fill light, Rim or Hair light
  • Colour, texture, shape and form

 

Shaded Environments, Flash And Overcoming A Few Challenges

Shaded Environments, Flash And Overcoming A Few Challenges

If you go down to the woods for an outdoor portrait with your flash, you may notice a disparity between colour temperatures in terms of unflattering skin tones and washed out greens that can often have a negative impact on outdoor portrait images and trying to fix this in post processing will take time, effort and skill.

So what is affecting the images? The cause is the colour disparity between the different light temperatures. Flash is a daylight-balanced light source, with a temperature of 5500K. However, shade has a higher temperature than 5500k and can range from 6500k-9000k depending on the type of shade you place your subject in.

One advantage of using flash is that we can gel it to help adjust and balance colour temperatures. The two most useful types of gels for flash are CTO’s & CTB’s, but for this blog, I will focus on the CTB.

CTB (Colour Temperature Blue) CTB gels come in varying strengths, full, half, quarter. (often called cuts) By using a half CTB gel on the flash we can convert the colour temperature from 5500 to 7900k and by setting the cameras (WB) White Balance between 7100k and 7900k we can balance the ambient light temperature and the flash temperature, thus achieving a balanced look and feel to images.

By using gels to adjust colour temperatures, it will equip you to remove or reduce the unflattering colour disparity often encountered when taking outdoor portraits in the shade.

Personally, I am still learning about colour science in relation to flash & gels, but like most things in relation to photography, you just have to experiment and practice.

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